By John Vlahakis

The Copenhagen Climate Negotiations are over, and we are not in a better place for it.  There is no binding agreement in place to create a better planet.  One of the questions being raised from these discussions, is just how much CO2 can the planet handle.

Air Pollution, it's the air that we breath.

Air Pollution, it's the air that we breath.

CO2 has been increasing since the beginning of the industrial revolution.  Climatologists have the scientific evidence, that shows man being the primary culprit, in raising CO2 levels since then.  The data supports the evidence.  We have been adding 2 ppm of CO2 each year.  We now stand at 387 ppm of CO2 in the atmosphere.  We will be at 450 ppm in 30 years if nothing is done.  At that level of CO2 we will raise the temperature of the planet by 3 degrees Celsius, which for us Americans equates to 37.4 degrees Fahrenheit.  Scientists are fearful the current rate of CO2 output is rising faster due to China, India, and the rest of world’s growing industrializatione, that we will hit 550 ppm in 30 years vs the 450 ppm.  What level of CO2 can we and the planet endure?  Scientists feel that the planet can handle 350 ppm on an on going basis, and that the discussions should not be about stalling CO2 at 387, but bringing it back down to under 350 ppm.  They would prefer to see it back down to 287 ppm. To give you an idea it of what it would take to lower these emissions back down, it would take an 80% reduction of current CO2 output over 10 years.  To achieve this type of reduction would take a massive shift in society – from industry to diet, and with some fortitude, the introduction of new technologies to capture airborne CO2 particles.  Such devices have been drawn up, and are waiting for funding to build a fully functioning prototype.  Closing the gap in CO2 emissions are crucial for our existence.  We do know the more warming that goes on out there, the threat to our planet  and ourselves only increases.

John Vlahakis

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